HOW POOR EYE MOVEMENT CAN INTERFERE WITH YOUR LEARNING

Can poor eye movement interfere with learning? A definitive yes, because poor eye movements can impair reading ability and cause a lack of concentration that may be incorrectly diagnosed as ADD or ADHD. After all, poor eye movements can often go hand in hand with eye teaming and focusing. 

Saccades, a visual skill that allows for transitioning visual focus from one object to another, and tracking, which allows you to follow an object as it moves through space, are both necessary components of good eye movement. Lacking either, visual skills may be very debilitated, or at the least, cause children to overcompensate for their poor eye movement.

Children with poor eye movements can have difficulty tracking a ball in sports, or focusing on words when reading. Your eyes use saccades to focus on one or several words at a time. Poor saccades can increase reading difficulties, which can obviously greatly interfere with learning. Poor eye movement can also result in an inability to maintain eye contact or cause distractions during highly visual tasks.

But poor eye movement can be corrected. Developmental optometrists can help improve eye movement through vision therapy exercises, prescription lenses, and the use of syntonics – colored lights that adjust aspects of eye movements. Once corrected, learning capabilities increase.

Author
Dr. Elise Brisco

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